High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC — Carbon is the fourth-most-abundant element in the universe and takes on a wide variety of forms, called allotropes, including diamond and graphite.

High Pressure

Washington, DC, 15 September 2011- A new study including Wenge Yang from Carnegie reveals a new phase of high energy Aluminum produced using an ultrafast laser induced confined micro-explosion inside a sapphire.

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC—Glasses differ from crystals. Crystals are organized in repeating patterns that extend in every direction. Glasses lack this strict organization, but do sometimes demonstrate order among neighboring atoms.

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC — Although its name may make many people think of flowers, the element germanium is part of a frequently studied group of elements, called IVa, which could have applications for next-generation computer architecture as well as implications for fundamental condensed matter physics.

New research conducted by Xiao-Jia Chen, Viktor Struzhkin, and Ho-kwang (Dave) Mao from Geophysical Laboratory at Carnegie Institution for Science, along with collaborators from China, reveals details of the element’s transitions under pressure. Their results show extraordinary agreement with the predictions of modern condensed matter theory.

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC—Chemical compounds called manganites have been studied for many years since the discovery of colossal magnetoresistance, a property that promises important applications in the fields of magnetic sensors, magnetic random access memories and spintronic devices.

High Pressure

Washington, DC, 14 December 2010- Materials can take on surprising shapes under pressure.

High Pressure

Washington, DC, 28 October 2010- Lasers are used extensively for exploring the nature of materials under extreme conditions, including high pressures and temperatures.

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC, 18 August 2010- Researchers from the University of Michigan and the Geophysical Laboratory have demonstrated a new method for quantitatively measuring the degree of pressure-induced atomic disordering in pyrochlore oxides using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared spectroscopy and Raman scattering techniques. 

High Pressure, Materials

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