Materials

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Yifei Mo of the Department of Material Sciences and Engineering at the University of Maryland.

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Sébastian Merkel of Université Lille 1.  He will present, "The fate of post-perovskite in the Earth's D'' layer: Insights from grain tracking experiments."

Materials

Washington, DC— A team including several Geophysical Laboratory scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor.

Carbon is an element of seemingly infinite possibilities. This is because the configuration of its electrons allows for numerous self-bonding combinations that give rise to a range of materials with varying properties. For example, transparent, superhard diamonds, and opaque graphite, which is used for both pencils and industrial lubricant, are comprised solely of carbon.

Materials

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Alexey Kolmogorov of Binghamton University.  He will present, "New materials made under pressure: from prediction to discovery."

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC—It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. (Not to mention the fact that it makes up an awful lot of the Earth’s crust.) Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number 14.

High Pressure

Washington, DC—Hydrogen is both the simplest and the most-abundant element in the universe, so studying it can teach scientists about the essence of matter. And yet there are still many hydrogen secrets to unlock, including how best to force it into a superconductive, metallic state with no electrical resistance.

High Pressure

Washington, DC— New work from a team including the Geophysical Laboratory's Guoyin Shen and Yoshio Kono used high pressure and temperature to reveal a kind of “structural memory” in samples of the metal bismuth, a discovery with great electrical engineering potential.

Matter at Extreme States

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Ranga Dias of Harvard University.  He will present, "Pressing the simplest element to exotic quantum states."

High Pressure, Materials

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with our own Sergey Lobanov.  He will present, "Peeking into the color of the lower mantle: Optical studies of minerals at high P/T.”

Planetary Science

Washington, DC—New work from the Geophysical Laboratory’s Stephen Elardo and Anat Shahar shows that interactions between iron and nickel under the extreme pressures and temperatures similar to a planetary interior can help scientists understand the period in our Solar System’s youth when planets were forming and their cores were created. Their findings are published by Nature Geoscience.

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