Astrobiology

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Carl Agee from the University of New Mexico.  He will present, "NWA 7034 aka Black Beauty: Unique Water-rich Meteorite from Ancient Mars."

Astrobiology, Mineralogy, Planetary Science

Washington, DC— A team of scientists including Carnegie’s Dina Bower and Andrew Steele weigh in on whether microstructures found in 3.46 billion-year-old samples of a silica-rich rock called chert found in Western Australia are the planet’s oldest fossils.

Department

Research made by the Curiosity science team made Discover Magazine's number one science story of 2013.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC—After extensive analyses by a team of scientists led by Carl Agee at the University of New Mexico, researchers have identified a new class of Martian meteorite that likely originated from Mars’s crust.

Astrobiology, Department

Washington, DC, 6 August 2012 -- NASA’s rover Curiosity, the size of a small car, touched down in a Martian crater early Monday. Geophysical Laboratory scientists are contributing to the mission.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC — Molecules containing large chains of carbon and hydrogen--the building blocks of all life on Earth--have been the targets of missions to Mars from Viking to the present day.

Astrobiology, Planetary Science

Washington, DC—Meteorites hold a record of the chemicals that existed in the early Solar System and that may have been a crucial source of the organic compounds that gave rise to life on Earth.

Mineralogy

Washington, DC, 14 April 2011- How amino acids attach to mineral surfaces is important for understanding bioadhesion, biomineralization, solar cell development and the origin of life. A study by Geophysical Laboratory scientists sheds new light on this important interaction.

Astrobiology, Geochemistry

Washington, DC— In the 1950s, biochemist Stanley Miller performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that organic compounds could be created under conditions mimicking the primordial Earth.

Astrobiology

Washington, DC — The evolution of complex life forms may have gotten a jump start billions of years ago, when geologic events operating over millions of years caused large quantities of phosphorus to wash into the oceans.