High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Wan Si Tang is a postdoctoral associate at the Geophysical Laboratory. She is working with Tim Strobel on research to synthesize metastable materials using molecular precursor-based pathways.

Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Piezoelectric materials are a class of smart materials that can convert electrical energy to mechanical energy and vice versa. Developing new piezoelectrics for novel electromechanical device applications has been a long-lasting interest, both scientifically and technologically. Nearly all known piezoelectrics possess positive longitudinal piezoelectric coefficients: the lattice expands when applying an electric field along the polar axis. The negative response, a material contracting in response to an applied electric field, has been considered a rare and counterintuitive anomaly.  However, there is no fundamental physics preventing the realization of negative response. In the work recently published in Physical Review Letters, the Geophysical Laboratory's Shi Liu and Ron Cohen showed that the negative response is not so rare after all.

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Ross Hrubiak, who comes from our HPCAT location. He will present, "Experimental evidence of a body centered cubic iron at the Earth’s core condition."

High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC— Reservoirs of oxygen-rich iron between the Earth’s core and mantle could have played a major role in Earth’s history, including the breakup of supercontinents, drastic changes in Earth’s atmospheric makeup, and the creation of life, according to recent work from an international research team published in National Science Review.

Materials, Matter at Extreme States

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Luke Shulenburger of Sandia National Laboratory. He will present, “Pushing the boundaries of computational electronic structure by studying matter under extreme conditions?"

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Russell Maier of NIST. He will present, "Point Defect Chemistry of Oxide Perovskites: The Dominant Impacts of Dilute Dopants."

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Washington, DC— A team of Geophysical Laboratory high-pressure physicists have created a form of carbon that’s hard as diamond, but amorphous, meaning it lacks the large-scale structural repetition of a diamond’s crystalline structure. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications.

Materials

Mijanur Rahaman is a postdoctoral associate at the Geophysical Laboratory. He is working with Ron Cohen on the study on ferroelectrics, multiferroics, relaxor ferroelectrics, and piezoelectric materials using first-principles calculations and experiments.

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Our science cannot be accomplished without state-of-the-art instruments. But sometimes the existing tools simply aren’t enough.

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Washington, DC  A group of scientists led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Huiyang Gou and Timothy Strobel performed high-pressure experiments on linear dicyanoacetylene (C4N2) using a diamond anvil cell, in which a pressure-induced reaction process was uncovered. Discrete linear C4N2 molecules were found to polymerize into a disordered extended network without significant change to the bulk composition.

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