High Pressure, Materials

Washington, DC—It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications. (Not to mention the fact that it makes up an awful lot of the Earth’s crust.) Yet there is still so much to learn about how to harness the capabilities of element number 14.

High Pressure

Washington, DC—Hydrogen is both the simplest and the most-abundant element in the universe, so studying it can teach scientists about the essence of matter. And yet there are still many hydrogen secrets to unlock, including how best to force it into a superconductive, metallic state with no electrical resistance.

High Pressure

Washington, DC— New work from a team including the Geophysical Laboratory's Guoyin Shen and Yoshio Kono used high pressure and temperature to reveal a kind of “structural memory” in samples of the metal bismuth, a discovery with great electrical engineering potential.

High Pressure

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Johnny Zhang of Scripps.  He will present, "Experiments on Fe-Ni-S Liquid with Silicate Solids under Mantle Conditions: Implications for Deep Carbon, Primordial Components and LLSVPs

High Pressure, Materials

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with our own Sergey Lobanov.  He will present, "Peeking into the color of the lower mantle: Optical studies of minerals at high P/T.”

High Pressure, Materials, Matter at Extreme States

Amol Karandikar is a postdoctoral associate working with Tim Strobel and Reinhard Boehler.  Amol is working on material synthesis and phase stability of carbon/hydrogen rich compounds and light element transport in metals.

High Pressure

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Ercan Alp of Argonne National Laboratory.  He will present, "Recent Advances in Nuclear Resonant Scattering Under High Pressure.”

Planetary Science

The Geophysical Laboratory's weekly seminar series continues with Burkhard Militzer of UC Berkeley. He will present, "Ab initio simulations of liquids and solids at high pressure."

Washington, DCIn Earth’s interior, water (H2O) plays an important role in rock physics, but geoscientists rarely treat water in its constituent forms, that is as hydrogen plus oxygen. New work from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Dave Mao has identified that hydrogen can escape from the water under conditions found in Earth’s lower mantle leading to a new paradigm in lower mantle chemistry. Their results were published in Proceeding of the National Academic Science, U.S.A.

High Pressure, Matter at Extreme States

Washington, DC— Although helium is the second most-abundant element (after hydrogen) in the universe, it doesn’t play well with others. It is a member of a family of seven elements called the noble gases, which are called that because of their chemical aloofness—they don’t easily form compounds with other elements. Helium, widely believed to be the most inert element, has no stable compounds under normal conditions. 

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