Ho-kwang (Dave) Mao
Staff Scientist
Office: 
R-127
Phone: 
(202) 478-8960

Ho-kwang Mao's research centers on ultra-high pressure physics, chemistry, material sciences, geophysics, geochemistry and planetary sciences using diamond-anvil cell techniques that he has pioneered. He received a Ph.D. and M.S. from University of Rochester in 1968 and 1966, and a B.S. in geology from National University in Taiwan, China in 1963.

Areas of interest: 

Related News

Materials
Washington, DC— A team including several Geophysical Laboratory scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor. Carbon is an element of seemingly infinite possibilities. This is because the configuration of its electrons allows for numerous self-bonding combinations that give rise to a range of materials with varying properties. For example, transparent, superhard diamonds, and opaque graphite, which is used for both pencils and industrial lubricant, are comprised solely of carbon.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—Hydrogen is both the simplest and the most-abundant element in the universe, so studying it can teach scientists about the essence of matter. And yet there are still many hydrogen secrets to unlock, including how best to force it into a superconductive, metallic state with no electrical resistance.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—In Earth’s interior, water (H2O) plays an important role in rock physics, but geoscientists rarely treat water in its constituent forms, that is as hydrogen plus oxygen. New work from a team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Dave Mao has identified that hydrogen can escape from the water under conditions found in Earth’s lower mantle leading to a new paradigm in lower mantle chemistry. Their results were published in Proceeding of the National Academic Science, U.S.A.
Materials
Washington, DC— Using laboratory techniques to mimic the conditions found deep inside the Earth, a team of Geophysical Laboratory scientists led by Ho-Kwang “Dave” Mao has identified a form of iron oxide that they believe could explain seismic and geothermal signatures in the deep mantle. Their work is published in Nature.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—Colossal magnetoresistance is a property with practical applications in a wide array of electronic tools including magnetic sensors and magnetic RAM.
High Pressure
Washington, DC— A Carnegie-led team was able to discover five new forms of silica under extreme pressures at room temperature. Their findings are published by Nature Communications.
High Pressure
Washington, DC—Breaking research news from a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Ho-kwang “Dave” Mao reveals that the composition of the Earth’s lower mantle may be significantly different than previously thought. These results are to be published by Science.
High Pressure
Washington, DC, 19 June 2013--Using novel high-pressure x-ray techniques, Geophysical Laboratory scientists Li Zhang, Yue Meng (HPCAT), Wenge Yang (HPSync), and Ho-kwang Mao, along with CDAC Partner Wendy Mao (Stanford) and colleagues from the University of Chicago have obtained the very first single-crystal structure of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 postperovskite phase under high pressure corresponding to the condition in the Earth’s D′′ layer.
High Pressure
Washington, DC — When materials are stressed, they eventually change shape. Initially these changes are elastic, and reverse when the stress is relieved. When the material’s strength is exceeded, the changes become permanent.
High Pressure
Washington, DC — Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance.

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