Yingwei Fei
Staff Scientist
Office: 
R-102
Phone: 
(202) 478-8936

Yingwei Fei examines materials at high pressure and temperature. He is interested in phase transitions, element partitioning, melting relations, chemical reactions and physical properties with applications to geophysics, petrology, mineral physics, geochemistry and planetary sciences. He obtained a Ph.D. in geochemistry from City University of New York in 1989 and a B.S. in geochemistry from Zhejiang University, China in 1982.

Areas of interest: 

Related News

Materials
Washington, DC— A team including several Geophysical Laboratory scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor. Carbon is an element of seemingly infinite possibilities. This is because the configuration of its electrons allows for numerous self-bonding combinations that give rise to a range of materials with varying properties. For example, transparent, superhard diamonds, and opaque graphite, which is used for both pencils and industrial lubricant, are comprised solely of carbon.
Matter at Extreme States
Washington, DC— A team led by the Geophysical Laboratory's Yingwei Fei, a experimental petrologist, and Cheng Xu, a field geologist from Peking University, has discovered that a rare sample of the mineral majorite originated at least 235 miles below Earth’s surface.
High Pressure
Yingwei Fei, a high-pressure experimentalist at the Geophysical Laboratory, and Peter Driscoll, a theoretical geophysicist at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, have been awarded a Carnegie Science Venture Grant for their project “Direct Shock Compression of Pre-synthesized Mantle Mineral to Super-Earth Interior Conditions.”
Department
In August, the Geophysical Laboratory reached a major milestone - the publication of our 5,000th scientific paper!  The first Geophysical Laboratory paper was published in 1905.
High Pressure
Washington, DC, 14 April 2015— The cores of terrestrial planets and satellite bodies, including our own Moon, all contain large quantities of iron.
High Pressure
Washington, DC — The composition of the Earth’s core remains a mystery. Scientists know that the liquid outer core consists mainly of iron, but it is believed that small amounts of some other elements are present as well.
Department
Washington, DC— Carnegie scientists Kenneth Caldeira of the Department of Global Ecology, Yingwei Fei of the Geophysical Laboratory, and Steven Shirey of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism have been elected 2010 Fellows of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).